London Gliding Club

cross country

Gliding is not only about gently drifting to ground.

On most good gliding days, long cross country flights are flown from the London Gliding Club. These range in size from 50 miles up to over 500 miles!

On weekends there is a task briefing covering the weather, airspace, and three tasks of varying difficulty. Pilots choose which one they want to fly, program it into their flight computers (so they don't get lost) and set off. Sometimes this is an informal race, but more often than not it's a chance to fly side by side with your friends.

Cross country pilots get better with practice and training. The satisfaction of reading and beating the weather, and achieving your own personal best is immense.

The British Gliding Association has a online competition called the BGA Ladder. This allows glider pilots to record how far and fast they flew, and compare their flights to other pilots. At the end of the year prizes are awarded for the best flights and pilots.

143 returns
143 returns image <1 of 3>
whilst much of a cross country flight involves circling in lift,
the last phase involves losing any extra height on the way
back to the airfield. This is done by flying faster and faster,
and when judged perfectly provides a stunning display as
the glider 'pulls up' and joins the landing circuit.
sharing a thermal
sharing a thermal image <2 of 3>
turning gliders do a marvellous job of
showing other gliders where the lift is
finishing
finishing image <3 of 3>
perfect end to a perfect flight?
Contact Us & Location
London Sailplanes Ltd, Trading as the London Gliding Club.
Tring Road, Dunstable, Bedfordshire, LU6 2JP.
Office 01582 663 419. privacy information
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143 returnswhilst much of a cross country flight involves circling in lift, the last phase involves losing any extra height on the wayback to the airfield.  This is done by flying faster and faster, and when judged perfectly provides a stunning display as the glider 'pulls up' and joins the landing circuit.sharing a thermalturning gliders do a marvellous job of showing other gliders where the lift isfinishingperfect end to a perfect flight?